ACLED has recorded over 2,000 political violence and protest events in the Balkans — defined as Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Kosovo, and Serbia — since January 2018. Across all five countries, the most common event type is protests, the majority of which have been peaceful with no intervention. Swells of anti-government protests — mostly expressing dissatisfaction with policies addressing poor socio-economic conditions — occurred across multiple countries in the Balkans throughout 2018 and early 2019. In Serbia, the country with the highest event count, anti-government protests have surged and spread, especially through February 2019. There have also been high levels of anti-police protests in Bosnia and Herzegovina, especially in late 2018, after the alleged cover-up of the government’s role in the death of a young man. As 2019 continues, there will likely continue to be a preponderance of protests in the Balkans, and threatened governments may turn towards intervention to quell discontent.

© 2019 Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project (ACLED). All rights reserved.

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The Balkans – Europe Data Release
Melissa Pavlik
Melissa Pavlik
Melissa Pavlik is a Research Analyst at ACLED studying overarching trends of armed conflict across and within ACLED’s regions of study. She has degrees in Statistics and Political Science from the University of Chicago, and is currently studying in the War Studies Department at King’s College London. Her research focus include violent non-state actors and the intersection between the international political economy and political violence.
Lennart Landman
Lennart Landman
Lennart Landman is the Research Manager for Europe at ACLED, where he oversees the real-time coding, weekly analyses, and the expansion of coverage into new countries. He previously worked as a researcher on European security and defence issues for the Clingendael Institute in The Hague. He holds an MA in International Relations and is a PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen.
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